A week with Mac OS Yosemite


Available to developers since June 2nd, Yosemite is currently in beta, so there are bugs and glitches that won’t appear later this year when it’s released.

A premium OS for a premium range of computers. That’s not elitist, just look at the price tags, and after all, despite writing about Apple for years, I haven’t owned a Mac for very long, but, Mac OS is simply where I’m at my most productive. I still have a Windows desktop for doing heavy lifting and media serving, but the MacBook is where I spend all of my online time. Anyway, my point is that Yosemite feels like a ‘premium’ improvement on an already premium experience.

That said, I’m enjoying Yosemite. When I first saw the new dock leaked a few days before the WWDC keynote, my first thought was “Are they bringing back OS X Tiger?” But, perhaps in order to move forwards you have to look to the past first. While I’m a stickler for continuity and nostalgia, I don’t think the general dock design from Leopard to Mavericks had much of a future left in it, as it had been evolved as much as possible. In essence, a new dock design was due, and I’m happy with the way it went. The subtle translucency is very reminiscent of the iOS 7 and iOS 8 Control Center, and something I am a fan of as it makes the OS feel even more personal.

The fullscreen button on the left of title bars has gone, and instead been merged with the maximize button to the right. What this achieves is cleaner title bars, and may make the possibility of making apps go fullscreen more obvious to less savvy users (it happens). I don’t dislike it, and it means less cursor movement is required, so I suppose it’s a good change.

(This paragraph is a mess, but I can’t think how to rewrite it with improvements) Tabs in Chrome were crashing every second after loading content, so I have temporarily returned to Safari for web browsing on my MacBook. While this dents my tab continuity across my three key devices, it also means I’m experiencing the improvements to Safari. The bird’s eye view for tabs is a bit slow at the moment when transitioning, and feels like the Windows Phone 7 multitasking view, where upon selecting a tab, it zooms in to a screenshot of it, then visibly transitions into the live page. What would be nice is a trackpad gesture to enter the tab birds eye view. If that already exists, I’ve not noticed it, but could very much do with it. I tend to get carried away with tabs, often running into the eighties, where in Chrome that would be so many that i can’t actually distinguish between tabs. In Safari, thanks to the bird’s eye view and scrolling through the tab bar, I can easily get to the tab I’m looking for, and birds eye view makes mass closing of certain tabs a relative breeze. However, I reached a stage where I had so many tabs that in bird’s eye view they became a sliver of their former selves at the bottom of the list, and switching between any tabs became a very lengthy process with Safari becoming unresponsive. One pain that I’ve been reintroduced to through using Safari again is how the new tab text input is never ready instantly when I open a new tab, but rather responsive after a few seconds – which hits productivity. Pair that with the slowness that the shared links sidebar can bring, and some otherwise decent features become useless. However, I’ve had these responsiveness issues before Yosemite, so it isn’t a flaw in 10.10 specifically, just an ongoing lack of optimization.

As far as I can tell, the Calendar (which I run as a fullscreen window) keeps silently crashing or vanishing somewhere, but that’s not much of a pain. Mail has also become unreliable when fetching new emails, but that may just be the network. Dark mode isn’t present in the current beta, but I am eagerly anticipating it. ┬áIn its current state, Yosemite is a visual breath of fresh air for me, which alone would be a welcome upgrade. That there’s certain new functionality as well simply sweetens the deal, and I can’t wait to see what developers do in the way of widgets for the Notification Center.