Apple’s September 9th Event – a summary


I didn’t manage to watch the live stream for numerous reasons, so there won’t be my typical comments on the idiosyncrasies of the presenters.

There were countless leaks prior to the keynote, including iPhone shells and diagrams of the watch, so not much was an actual surprise. One thing I’d like to the tell journalists and media outlets is – don’t guess or try to coin the name of an upcoming Apple product, as you will be wrong. It happened with the Apple TV (guessed to be iTV), the iPad (guessed to be iSlate etc.), and now the Apple Watch (assumed to be called iWatch). Whether Apple runs with a different name just to toy with you, or you really just do have a spate of bad luck with guessing, simply don’t bother. If people had run with “the rumored Apple watch”, it would have been faultless. But no, mass media insists on claiming they have some scoop that nobody else does, so misinformation and rumors are spread. Rant over, now on to what was actually announced.

Not much. I’m not some spoiled Apple fanboy, particularly since I have no interest in iPhones because of the limitations of iOS, but Apple really didn’t announce much yesterday, particularly considering the hype they tried to create for the event. No iMac, Apple TV, or iPod refreshes, no Thunderbolt Display redesign to match the current iMac design, nothing. In fact, Apple even quietly killed the iPod Classic.

iPhone 6

Larger than the iPhone 5s, a 4.7″ display, has a landscape view similar to that of the iPad, is the thinnest iPhone to date, slightly longer battery life, burst mode with the front facing camera, A8 64-bit processor with M8 motion coprocessor, NFC, supports Apple Pay, continuous autofocus video, and the sports design we’ve all seen leaked for a couple of months now. Which may I just say has aspects rather reminiscent of a certain competing handset:

comparison

iPhone 6 Plus

Everything the iPhone 6 has, except a bigger screen (5.5″, with a ppi of 401 vs the iPhone 6’s 326ppi), is undeniably a phablet, slightly thicker than the iPhone 6, has a significantly longer battery life, and optical image stabilization.

Apple Watch

Undeniably the smartest smartwatch that’s been announced so far. However, it may be too smart. Features an incredibly cluttered UI, an overload of gimmicky features, and a variety of editions paired with a fairly smart interchangeable strap mechanism. Android smartwatches are more in the realm of a basic unobtrusive companion device, whereas the Apple Watch, despite requiring an iPhone (5c through to 6 Plus), offers the ability to do far far too much. So much that I don’t have the energy to list everything it’s capable of, so you can simply check the list yourself here – I predict that most people that buy Apple Watches will not use them to their full potential. Tim Cook said that development of the Apple Watch started after Steve Jobs passed away. It shows. The square iPod Nano was incredibly simplistic by contrast.

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Straight to the Facts – Apple’s September Event


September in the world of the sieve formerly known as Apple has usually been reserved for their big music event with iPod updates. However, the iPhone release schedule became rather unconventional in the past few years, resulting in today instead being the announcement of the next iPhone, or rather, iPhones. Here’s my traditional bullet-point rundown with some analysis:

The typical facts-and-figures updates:

  • the 5th annual iTunes festival – 30 nights of music live streamed to over 100 countries
  • Stanford is getting a new, bigger Apple store
  • October 2013 will mark the 700,000,000th iOS device being shipped
  • iWork is apparently the best selling mobile productivity app on any platform. Quite an impressive claim.
  • Pages, Numbers, Keynote, iMovie, and iPhoto free on all new iOS devices
  • iPhone 5 was the best-selling iPhone ever

iOS 7 (free to download from September 18th) features:

  • Siri enhancements and a male voice for Siri
  • New ringtones
  • Photos taken on vacation/holiday are put in groups
  • Available for iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPhone 5S, iPhone 5C, iPad 2, The New iPad, iPad 4th generation, iPad Mini, 5th generation iPod touch.

The iPhone 5 will not be relegated to being the budget last-gen iPhone, instead, the new iPhone 5C fits that gap, available in white and rather neon green,  blue, pink, and yellow. On a table it’ll look like an iPhone 5 with a colorful bumper, and on the rear they’re rather reminiscent of the 5th generation iPod touch but constructed from seamless hard-coated polycarbonate (yes, plastic, but “feels dense”) instead. Features:

  • 4 inch Retina touch display
  • A6 chip
  • 8MP iSight camera and FaceTime HD camera with better low-light performance
  • many LTE bands supported, BlueTooth 4.0, and dual-band WiFi.
  • Available on a two year contract for $99 (16GB) and $199 (32GB). Pre-order from September 13th (yes, that’s a Friday). Available in stores on September 20th (US, UK, Aus., Can., Fr., Germany, Japan, China, and Singapore)

For a budget device, it’s got some really good specifications. I imagine the “$99 on contract for 16GB of storage” will result in a lot of sales. All the colors and case variations will be a hipster’s dream.

iPhone 5S – available in grey w/ black bars, gold w/ white bars, and silver w/ white bars. Derrick Avery will be pleased with that.

  • the new A7 chip, up to 2x faster than the iPhone 5, and 56 times faster than the 2008 iPhone. Here’s the best part – it’s 64-bit. All of Apple’s built-in apps have been re-engineered, and it’ll still run 32-bit iOS apps fine.
  • another chip – the M7. It measures motion data (accelerometer, gyroscope, compass) constantly.
  • Battery gives 10 hours for 3G talking , LTE browsing, WiFi browsing, or video playback,  40 hours of music playback, and 250 hours standby time.
  • The camera has a whole host of automatic new features to take great photos without you having to change settings. New ‘True Tone’ flash that has 1,000 unique variations for capturing color temperature. Burst mode (hold the shutter down) for up to 10 shots per second with the ‘best shot’ choice similar to on the HTC One series. Slo-Mo 720p video at 120fps (same resolution/fps as the GoPro). Seemingly no mention of the camera resolution.
  • Touch ID: Fingerprint sensor in the home button – rest your finger on it and it unlocks (no need to click). You can also use your finger for iTunes purchase authentication. For the paranoid out there, it doesn’t store your fingerprint data on iCloud
  • On a two year contract it’s $199 for 16GB, $299 for 32GB, and $399 for 64GB. $49 for a case. Available in stores September 20th (US, UK, Aus., Can., Fr., Germany, Japan, China, and Singapore)

The 8GB iPhone 4S is now free on contract.

The event closes with musical guest Elvis Costello, which I’m more than happy with.

Not really much of an event, to be honest. One musician and a brief mention of iTunes Radio, so clearly not a music event. Yes, the iPhone 5S was announced with arguably less improvement over the 5 than the 4S was over the 4 – depends on how developers take advantage of the A7. If you’re wondering why I called Apple a sieve, that’s because some technology journalists got their hands on the bodies of the 5S and 5C weeks ago, as well as the (still unconfirmed but now likely to be identical to leaks) iPad 5 and iPad mini 2. Overlooking the iPhone 4 prototype fiasco, leaks as concrete as these really didn’t happen in the past.

2012, the year of the new Apple


So, the first complete year of Apple without Steve Jobs at the helm in the 2000s has drawn to a close, though who knows when his legacy of influence will end behind the scenes. It’s been quite a revolutionary year, though there haven’t been any brand new product lines.

The most notable and widest spread product update is certainly the iPhone, I say widest spread because it is unbelievably popular and even those who aren’t Mac users own them – it’s a fully featured Apple product that the masses are interested in and can afford. For example, I could spend a day without seeing a single Mac, but I’d be hard pressed to walk one block without seeing an iPhone. Anyway, this year’s iPhone update was certainly the biggest physical update we’ve ever seen – it now has a 4″ screen, and it’s ever steadily getting faster, but on the whole it’s the normal amount of new features Apple brings out yearly.

One feature to spread across Apple’s portable range has been the inevitably controversial lightning connector. Another first since 2007, Apple made a change to the connector port on the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and iPod nano, said by Apple themselves to be “a bold move”. Smaller, reversible, and hopefully a lot less prone to connections issues with fraying cables, it threw the accessory industry up in arms as their 30-pin connector products were nearly made redundant. Apple released a 30-pin connector to lightning port adapter, but really, the height of the new iPhone and iPod touch combined with that adapter just won’t fit in those speaker systems with an enclosed iPhone space. It also seems there are more cases available for the iPhone 4/4S than for the iPhone 5, but I’m hoping that situation will improve over the coming months.

iTunes was updated with a massive visual overhaul, covered in slightly more detail here. My opinions on it are still mixed, as queuing music is fantastic but I do miss the control I had over the way I viewed my music collection.

In the Mac corner, we saw the majority of devices getting thinner and faster, with the new iMac and retina MacBook Pro. We’re still awaiting a retina MacBook Air, but is there really a need? The Mac Pro has been largely overlooked yet again, I can’t remember when I last saw it get an update in a keynote rather than a subtle enhancement. Year by year it does look as if Apple is trying to drop the Mac Pro, but as impressive as the iMac gets each year, you just can’t beat 12 cores and 64GB of RAM, which many media professionals use daily.

Elsewhere there was an update to the Apple TV introducing 1080p output for the same price of $99. Not to forget the iPad mini, a product anticipated almost since the day the original iPad was released. And then there’s the iPad… when Apple announced a fourth generation, I fit into the category of people who asked themselves “but didn’t they just release the third generation?”. Yes, in a move uncharacteristically like Apple, they updated a product within their usual 12 month rotation – perhaps compensating for the iPhone 4 not being updated for nearly a year and a half.

And finally, there’s iOS 6. Making the headlines for all the wrong reasons, Apple released their first version of iOS without Google’s products being an out-of-the-box component because their deal expired. Google released a YouTube app on the App Store fairly promptly, but only recently updated it to support the iPhone 5’s screen size. I’m sure you won’t forget the Maps fiasco, with Apple’s maps being ridiculed and sneered at. Google left Apple users without an alternative until only earlier this month with Google Maps finally making it onto the App Store. I can’t imagine what took them so long to produce it, maybe they chose the path of letting Apple embarrass themselves rather than play the role of the instant hero. Nevertheless, I feel Jobs’ declaration of thermonuclear war on Apple will prevail posthumously.

Oh, one last thing in the Apple headlines – Scott Forstall was forced to leave Apple. With Steve out of the picture, Tim and Jony saw a chance to remove Forstall and his skeuomorphic design tendencies. While the appearance of iOS is getting stale, I personally don’t dislike Notes looking like a legal pad and folders having a cloth background, but clearly others want it gone. It would be interesting if 2013 brings a completely re-designed iOS.

In the ever-busy Apple ‘rumor mill’ we exit the year with a potentially Intel-powered Apple watch, interesting since the latest iPod nano did away with the form factor that made it wearable on the wrist, and the never-faltering suggestion of an actual Apple TV; a screen, not just a box.

When I started this back in 2010, I had no idea what the coming years would hold. This year I’ve only had 1,800 views, but considering there were only 11 posts excluding this one, that’s not too bad. I will try to get back into reporting every bit of Apple news there is in 2013 rather than just the key pieces, so please stick around for more to come and have a Happy New Year! I won’t be going any time soon, as despite the ever-present lack of a large and loyal reader-base, running this has at least contributed to my writing improving, something which will hopefully be beneficial in a career.

A disappointing Apple event?


I, like many, have been anticipating this event for a while – wondering if Apple was going to make foolish moves with timing, what they were going to release in their traditional Music month, and whether or not the various leaks and rumors were true.

However, I feel a bit dissapointed with the results. I’ll run through the products in order:

iPhone 5:

  • Thinner than my current phone the HTC One S (HTC’s thinnest device), but not as thin as the upcoming Huawei Ascend P1s. Maybe Apple wanted to rush out the iPhone 5 with the ‘thinnest smartphone’ title while it was merely a dubious claim rather than untrue.
  • At long last a wider screen, up from 3.5″ to 4″. However, they didn’t appear to do the smart thing of keeping the aspect ratio the same so as to not annoy developers again (as they had done in the past with the iPad screen size and then retina display). From what it looks, normal iPhone/iPod apps will sit in the centre of the screen. Which, speaking from the point of view of someone with a 4.3″ phone display, which suffers from the lack of a physical menu button, I have to have a significant amount of my screen space wasted for a virtual menu. At least that space is used for something though rather than Apple’s empty space
  • A better camera. Yeah, yeah, another incrementally better camera. Still 8MP, but better low light performance and noise reduction, with some impressive demonstration shots. I challenge anyone with the phone to take photos that looks that good.
  • The design has been updated in that it’s got those previously seen matt bars across it on the back
  • A new power connector – ‘lightning’ (don’t worry, they make a 30-pin to lightning adapter, though I don’t see the practicality of the adapter when it comes to accessories such as speaker systems with an enclosed iPhone area that now won’t be tall enough due to a) the adapter and b) the new height of the iPhone.

iTunes:

  • Rather a Zune-style re-design. I doubt it’ll become more usable or bloated, probably less usable and more bloated
  • The mobile iTunes and App Store apps have been updated to have the currently popular matt black style and a slightly clearer yet bulkier App description page view

iPod Nano:

  • Now looks suspiciously like the Zunes of yesteryear, seems more like a childish micro-iPod touch, with a plethora of gaudy colours to choose from
  • Has a bigger touchscreen and iDevice style home button (but is a circle in a circle instead of a square in a circle)
  • Same lightning connector
  • Defeats the whole point of ‘nano’, a word synonymous with very small. This is no longer very small. Admittedly some past generations of Nano weren’t that small either, but they do enjoy fluctuating between form factor with the Nano… perhaps we’ll see a nano Nano next year…

iPod touch:

  • Thinner than before. What a surprise, I thought they’d make it thicker. Oh, wait, no I didn’t, because that would be un-innovative and unappealing.
  • Has a 5MP camera and looks like it has a flash
  • As usual, not comparable to the current iPhone. Or even the 4S for that matter. Still, an improvement.
  • Aren’t you lucky, they just made the iPod touch as childish as the Nano – you can pick cyan or banana yellow if you really want to!

Earphones:

  • Eventually a new earphone design. Personally, I’ve never had any shape issues with the previous earbuds, but now you can have EarPods. And we all thought iPad was a ridiculous name back in 2010
  • Hopefully the sound quality won’t be as weedy as before and perhaps the cable will last a little longer.

So I don’t know what I was expecting, but I haven’t been particularly excited by this product announcement. Maybe it’s because iOS is not much different to how it was in 2007. After all, I wouldn’t be impressed by a supercomputer if I had to run Windows 98 on it rather than something a bit more up-to-date. An iPhone was inevitable and given that it’s September, new iPods were inevitable along with iTunes. So nothing really exciting, just timely updates. All in all, this video rather sums up the iPhone 5.

The new YouTube app


As you may know, last month Apple stated that their license with Google to include the YouTube app pre-installed on iOS devices has ended. What does this mean for you? Well, if you have an iOS device, you can get the new YouTube app from the app store right now. After installing it, you’ll notice it’s slightly different to the Android app with the main feed – you can opt out of Google’s non-subscription based suggestions. That is, you can stick with just seeing uploads from people you subscribe to in your main stream, rather than also see what they comment on, what they rate, and what they add to playlists. Personally, I welcome  this for two reasons; one being that with YouTube preloading on Android bumps subscribed uploads off the list in preference for newer activity which is just someone commenting on a video, and secondly, the entire activity list resulted in browsing through a lengthy stream of potentially uninteresting material.

The animations also feel a bit slicker than the Android ones in that it bounces a bit rather than just sliding to the side, resulting in the new iOS app feeling more polished and thought-out than the Android one.

Please HTC, I’m begging you.


First off, happy new year. Secondly, long time no see. Sorry about that, but there hasn’t been much happening in the world of Apple. Next, apologies for the following post not being Apple-related, I just find it stress relieving to air views like these.

As you may have read before, my main mobile phone at the moment is an HTC 7 Trophy. Before that, I had an HTC Touch Pro2, and before that, a Qtek 9100 (effectively an HTC Wizard). I also have a 3rd generation iPod Touch running iOS 5.0.1.

Windows Mobile always did what I needed. Well, it did what I needed in its hey-day, but when the web became more social, I became more restricted. The Qtek was fine for IRC and the odd tweet from Opera Mini, but I wanted something a little less brick-like. After having several years of productive joy with a physical landscape keyboard, I knew there was no alternate. So, I went for the latest Windows Mobile phone by HTC that had a landscape keyboard. Now I was able to have a fair amount of storage (the Wizard’s miniSD card slot never seemed to work) and less of a brick in my pocket. I missed the presence of a tab key, but a five row keyboard and tilting springing screen was worth the sacrifice. Now, firstly, who at HTC thought this phone had adequate specs?? I know I’ve gone on about this before at great length, but SERIOUSLY?? If you can’t run TouchFlo 3D smoothly all the time, the phone doesn’t have good specs. Being one of the few who actually utilises WinMo to its full potential, I had to disable TouchFlo. I am not alone when I say that on boot, 48%+ of the RAM was in use; and it NEVER drops below that. So, it was a painfully sluggish device and for a 2009 phone, really didn’t cut it on the twitter etc. front.

Some of you may remember my initial hatred for Windows Phone 7 when Microsoft announced it. Well, there was no way in hell I was sailing over to the Android ship, and there was no better WinMo device. Well, the HD2 isn’t bad and I do really want one, but it wouldn’t be a large enough step forward. I decided to go a little different and go for a phone with no physical keyboard. I still regret that choice on a daily basis when, for example, I’m busy pressing enter rather than backspace or send. I have an unwritten list of about five things I would really like to see in WP7, which I doubt I’ll be seeing any time soon. I loved the openness and flexibility of Windows Mobile, and after years and years with WinMo (even before the Qtek) and a year of jail broken iOS, I didn’t quite feel like stepping into a world arguably more locked-down than iOS. However, I made the leap and I don’t fully regret it.
The Trophy is undeniably a lovely looking phone. It doesn’t have any naff silver stick-on grille or buttons where the icons get rubbed off. What it does have is a perfect hand-held size (and I mean PERFECT), nice weight to it, classy slim silver outline around the screen (not quite the bezel?) and a simple-yet-elegant feel to it, but beneath the battery cover conceals its bit of orange flair. Unfortunately, mine does have rather a bit of cosmetic damage as it was second hand, but nothing to stop functionality. Whoever it was at HTC who designed this phone deserves a huge reward, as this phone beats all the typical HTC mode of plastic/rubber/metal/easily-damaged.
I can’t take a good photo (typically blurred from slight motion) and does holding the focus button make a difference when recording a video, or is that just me thinking it does to pass the time while it automatically tries (and fails) to re-focus. So, the camera isn’t great (true, but the shutter button is perfect). As everyone else, I too keep accidentally touching the capacitive buttons, especially the search button. I don’t like being trapped in an operating system. Yes, it makes you feel like there’s less chance of it going wrong, but I like freedom. I liked being able to transfer a file onto the microSD card of the TP2 with any computer instantly. And then I’d be able to open the file, in whatever I like. On WP7? No. It would be nice if there was an expansion slot, as it’s a real pleasure to watch, say, a TV episode on the Trophy’s screen rather than the iPod, but 8GB vs 64GB? iPod wins hands down. Well, TCPMP never worked smoothly on the TP2 and putting videos on the Trophy makes iTunes seem like a breeze. WP7 is great at keeping me in touch, mostly, and is incredibly fluid at performing social sharing tasks. Exceedingly slick. When the Titan was announced, I thought “imagine TV shows on a screen that size…”. And I still held that longing desire for the Titan… until I used one. It’s beyond big. I knew it was big, but it’s not big, it’s huge.

Look, my sincerest apologies Microsoft, we’ve had a really good run for goodness knows how long, but you just didn’t quite keep up when Android appeared. You thought you had, but all you did was create a better version of iOS. I remember your USP for WP7, and how I loathed the adverts. Then I owned a WP7 device, and accepted just how slick it was. Then I updated to Mango, and saw that you had abandoned the unique slickness and were trying to head down the other path and catch up with iOS and Android. Fair enough,

“the public gets what the public wants.”

“But I want nothing this society’s got”

The phone I want doesn’t exist. The mobile OS I want has been murdered. And it was a homicide, not a suicide. I don’t want to ditch the Trophy, as while it doesn’t do all the job, what it does do it does perfectly. The iPod fills my media needs just about. But I do think that Android is on the horizon for me… I would say “okay, if not the Titan, then the Sensation XL”. Umm, it’s white. And slow. And a complete copy of the Titan. The Titan looks good in black, just like the Trophy. I really don’t want a white phone. You know what was a factor of me being put off the Titan? The phone right next to it was the XL. Same price, same physical features. I had known for a long time about how much of a copy it was, but seriously? I’m fairly sure HTC will have lost more than one potential Titan customer due to “well, the Android version is exactly the same, and Android can do more”. But HTC didn’t let the XL do more on the hardware side. On that front, the XL sucks, so that’s no contender either. And whilst I would be lost without my iPod, I really don’t see myself being able to cope with an iPhone. So, until July, I shall be sticking with the Trophy. Please HTC, have a GOOD Android phone out then. One that is genuinely good. Better than the Droid 4 (doesn’t take much effort beating), better than the Galaxy S II. Something genuinely brilliant. I want a good camera, a physical shutter button (two-stage like the Trophy), microUSB, a microSD slot, 1GB+ RAM, 1.5GHz+ single core/1GHz+ dual core (per-core clock speed, not total), lovely design (same colour scheme as the Trophy would be nice), and a large-but-not-as-large-as-the-Titan screen. I suppose a device that looks like the Trophy, perhaps a teeny bit bigger screen, 0.1/0.2 inches bigger perhaps? Do what you want with the four OS control buttons, as I can’t decide, but please make them look nice if they’re physical. Oh, and a directional pad of some sort would be fantastic 😀 Look, if you bring out a device like that, I’m fairly sure you’ll gain a LOT of fans. Everyone who cares about mobile phones has a phone like this on their mind, but to them and I it’s just a wild dream. Please make it a reality.

New MacBook Pro update


As usual, it seems to be time for they frequent and rather unanounced/secretive. This latest lineup includes faster processors and better graphics, along with new hard drive brackets (in the sense of tiers, not affixing). It’s another one of their ‘fairly big improvements, but secretive updates’ that I suppose would annoy those that had recently bought a very expensive and powerful MacBook Pro. But hey, that’s the risk you take with Apple. I guess die-hard fans should be happy they got 16 months of the iPhone 4 being the latest rather than the tyical 12 months and then the next update being rather insignificant. Is it though? I think it does bring several better feautures to the table, the camera alone.

post-Apple iPhone 5 Event


Firstly, it’s not the iPhone 5, it’s the ‘4S’ 😛

 

The keynote was presented by Tim Cook (amongst the usual Apple folk such as Scott Forstall) completely without Steve Jobs. Unfortunately, I haven’t seen how Tim did with presenting it, but from some videos of him and phone carriers answering questions, he seemed to be the usual “seem as if you’re answering the question, but really completely avoiding it” sort of person.

At long last, iOS has been given a specific release date. Before they announced it, I tweeted:

I’m hoping that they release iOS 5, or at least give us a launch date that’s soon.

Lo and behold, they announced a release data that isn’t too far away. Next Wednesday (the 12th October) to be specific.

After recapping everything that the majority of people following the keynote already knew, they got round to announcing the next iPhone, the iPhone 4S (released on October 14th in Apple’s usual launch countries.).

At last, an iPhone with 64GB of storage. Some people say this is a bit silly given that iOS 5 is rather heavily cloud based, but I personally like having my data physically with me (for various reasons, such as current internet connection speeds are not fast enough for the cloud to be as on-demand as a physical copy is). So, three tiers of iPhone 4S, being:

  • 16GB for $199
  • 32GB for $299
  • 64GB for $399
On the specs side, it has a dual core A5 processor, a dual core graphics chip, an 8MP camera (that can shoot 1080p HD video), has two antennas and is a ‘world phone’.
There’s also this improved voice command integration with Siri (which seems to be exclusive to the 4S). Not many real people seem to be too impressed withthis. Nor should they be, other phones have had usable voice command capabilities for ages. Even my Qtek 9100 from 2006 allowed me to record a voice command that it could then later match to complete a task. Sure, Siri is more modern than that, but it’s not really too impressive.
Also announced was the next iPod Touch, which seems to be pretty much the same, there’s just a white version as well (and apparently a lower price, but I don’t remember the previous $ price).
That’s pretty much all the main stuff… There was some greeting card stuff, but very few people seemed to be excited by the prospect 😛

pre-Apple iPhone 5 event


Well, tomorrow is once again the big day.

Firstly, I wonder who will be presenting it? At a guess, I’d say Tim Cook. However, he doesn’t seem quite as enigmatic and enthusiastic as Steve Jobs was.

What’s on the list to appear? Well, the next iPhone (be it iPhone 5, iPhone 4S etc.).

What do I hope will be announced? I’m hoping that they’ll announce the release of iOS 5 tomorrow. Well, it’d be a smooth time to deploy it.

My probable iOS update dilemma


Well, it’s nearing the sixth, and Apple will most likely be announcing iOS 5 (maybe it’s been confirmed by them, I forget). As you may have gathered from some of my tweets over the past while, I have a third generation 64GB iPod Touch running iOS 4.0 (yes, 4.0, not 4.0.1 or 4.0.2, just 4.0). I updated to it about two hours after it’s release (a day which I had been eagerly anticipating since Apple announced a specific release date. I even made a rudimentary countdown thing out of post-it notes) as soon as I got back home. Overall, I was pretty happy with it. There were several huge flaws, such as all photos that weren’t in ‘saved photos’ were now awful quality. Oh, and the Music app (including the Videos app) crashed each time I tapped on it, meaning my iPod now no longer performed it’s primary function. I managed to sort out the crashing problem within a few days, but it was a pain nonetheless.
I remember it vividly yet I’m not sure what the event was. On the way back from the coast, I kept checking for Apple news updates. Just remembered what the event was (as this is statically displayed this probably looks odd. If it was live text display, such as speech, it would make sense), it was the September Apple music event where they had just announced the new line of iPods. When I got home, I decided to jailbreak my iPod, with some helpful tips and guidance from the two twitter users @wondroushippo and @zabmanic, two very nice and helpful people, so I would like to thank them here properly for their tips rather than in a limited 140 characters. So, thank you 😀
I had attempted to jailbreak my iPod before, using the USB to PC methods many many times, but it had never worked. There isn’t really any method easier than http://jailbreakme.com. You simply visit the site on your iDevice (you have to be running iOS 4.0 or 4.0.1. Can’t remember if 4.0.2 was the last working one or the one Apple released as a patch) and just slide a lock-screen style slider. Then you wait a few minutes, and it’s done.
Anyway, I always seem to manage to go into deeper detail than is properly necessary. I’ll try to get back to the main point now. So, currently, my iPod is jailbroken. I do benefit from it, whether just using SBSettings (fantastic, especially being able to change the brightness without having to quit an app and go to settings), backgrounder (makes all apps multitask. Sure, it slows the device down if you have too many running, but it’s better than having just about 20% of apps having multitasking and the rest not) and mxtube (hard to locate the videos, but handy nonetheless, YouTube downloader), to name probably my top three most used jailbreaking features. I’ve managed to get by without Game Centre and all the other updates, but will I be able to cope without the new features in iOS 5? As far as I am aware, it isn’t really a good idea to try and update the firmware on a jailbroken iDevice. Also, as I discovered running 4.0, most hackstore (Cydia) stuff works best on older versions of iOS. For example, the version of MobileTerminal on Cydia crashes on startup in 4.0, but their is a newer compatible version available through another source.
If iOS 5 is just a teeny update, then I doubt updating will even cross my mind. However, this is Apple. They work like clockwork (mostly). Chances are, this update is going to provide some pretty groundbreaking stuff (and will probably be compatible with the 3rd generation, considering the past. 4.0 is compatible-ish with 2nd, 3rd and 4th, so 5.0 will probably be compatible-ish with 3rd, 4th and the future 5th. By “compatible-ish, I mean the 2nd generation iDevices couldn’t do multitasking or home screen wallpapers, but they could run the OS).
Would I be able to cope without the jailbreaking advantages? I doubt it. And if I had to, my usage of the device would be a lot more time consuming and less productive. It would also result in me using computers more than it. Is that really what you want happening, Apple?